A-to-Z Challenge, Daylily

D is for Daylilies

My favorite flowers in the garden have to be the daylilies.  I started my collection with the standard Stella D’oro, and they continue to be the most productive plants.

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I have divided them numerous times, shared them with countless neighbors and friends, offered them up to the Garden Club for our annual May Mart flower sale, and I still have more to divide and conquer.  I simply cannot bring myself to destroy any, so they keep on reproducing!

One of the best features of the daylily has to be (in my own opinion) the ease of which they grow.  I do deadhead them, simply to encourage more blooms.  The plant’s purpose is to produce seeds, so the more you frustrate that attempt by removing spent flowers, the more the plant tries to reproduce by producing more flowers.  Simple.  And by late summer, many of the leaves around the base have turned brown.  Easy to remove and actually revitalize the appearance.

And they come back, year after year, even in my snowy part of the world.  And the first plants start blooming in late May, with the final show ending sometime in late August.  If you are lucky, you get a second blooming period.  No muss, no fuss.  Reliable.

A few springs back, I attended the May Flower Sale at Phipps Conservatory, which just happens to be located right across the street from where I work the day job.  I was astounded by the multitudes of varieties that the local chapter of the American Hemerocallis Society (aka American Daylily Society) had on display and for sale.  They had catalogs of all different varieties, too numerous to even count, picture albums that included the names of each.

I had some variety in mind, and naively thought I would be able to locate it in their catalog.

When I first started collecting Daylilies, I created small name tags to keep with the plants.  But these tags have been long-lost and faded, so now I really don’t know what I have. I make up names for them, and continue to Google daylilies just to try to identify them.  Diploids, tetraploids, (something to do with chromosomes, sounds too technical) throat color, petal shape, height – so many ways to differentiate.

The latest one I (thought I) ordered was called Coach’s Fast Break.  This was the picture of what I thought I was ordering (on the left).

And this is what bloomed (on the right).  A quick search on Google, and I think I have Coach’s Braided Angel.  Surprise!!

D

 

Can’t wait for this summer’s daylily show to begin!

 

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4 thoughts on “D is for Daylilies”

  1. I love daylilies. I only have three, but they were chosen for their specific spot and look better than I imagined in it! I have two Bonanza and one American Revolution. Mine will need dividing, probably next year. I want to line a vague pathway in the far back area with them. Over time…

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  2. I love day lilies and the previous owner of our house had several large beds of them. Then we got dogs…and they love the coolness of the drodden down leaves in the summer. Guess who trod them down? LOL! This fall we will dig out the bulbs and move them to new beds in the front of the house.

    Donna B McNicol, author & traveler
    Romance & Mystery…writing my life
    A-Z Flash Fiction Tales: http://dbmcnicol.blogspot.com
    A-Z of Goldendoodles: http://ourprimeyears.blogspot.com

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